Types of Carriages
  A phaeton was a light and usually low-slung, four-wheeled open carriage drawn by a pair of horses. One variation often seen in novels is the “high perch” phaeton which is seen as much more precarious and probably more aptly named after Phaetõn, the son of the Greek sun-god Helios, who was known for his bad driving of the sun chariot.   Coaches were stately carriages with four wheels and windows on all sides. The curved underbody and seating for four passengers were also characteristic. A Town Coach was massive and often drawn by up to six horses and usually sported a coat of arms painted on the doors.   The barouche had a collapsible hood over the back and was considered a summer vehicle used for driving in the great parks. It was drawn by a pair of high quality horses to complement the expensive and fashionable vehicle.    
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  The brougham was an enclosed carriage drawn by a single horse and had fewer windows than a coach. Designed by Lord Brougham in 1839, it was popular in the Victorian age with both the middle and upper classes.    A shooting-brake, was a brake pressed into service to carry beaters, gamekeepers and sportsmen with their dogs, guns and game. There were purpose-built shooting-brakes designed to carry the driver and a footman or gamekeeper at the front facing forward, and passengers on longitudinal benches, with their dogs, guns and game borne along the sides in slatted racks   A landau was a four-wheeled carriage with a folding two-part hood. The front and rear halves could be raised and lowered independently.
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  A trap, pony trap (sometimes pony and trap) or horse trap is a light, often sporty, two-wheeled or sometimes four-wheeled horse- or pony-drawn carriage, usually accommodating two to four persons in various seating arrangements, such as face-to-face or back-to-back.  

The victoria was an elegant French carriage, possibly based on a phaeton made for George IV. A victoria may be visualized as essentially a phaeton with the addition of a coachman's box-seat.   Though in English the name victoria was not employed for a carriage before 1870, when one was imported to England by the Prince of Wales in 1869, the type was made some time before 1844. It was very popular amongst wealthy families. On a low body, it had one forward-facing seat for two passengers and a raised driver's seat supported by an iron frame, all beneath a calash top. It was usually drawn by one or two horses. This type of carriage became fashionable with ladies for riding in the park, especially with a stylish coachman installed.

  The stagecoach was a four-wheeled vehicle pulled by horses or mules. The primary requirement was that it was used as a public conveyance, running on an established route and schedule. Vehicles that were used included buckboards and dead axle wagons, surplus Army ambulances and celerity (or mud) coaches. Selection of the vehicle was made by the owner of the stage line, and he would choose the most efficient vehicle based upon the load to be carried, the road conditions, and the weather; and used a two, four or six-horse team based upon those factors and the type of car.
   
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  It was called the Bronson Wagon, and by 1900 became the popular sporting wagon for country gentlemen. Its framed and paneled sides were the inspiration for the “woodie” station wagons that were popular from the late teens through the 1950s. Brewster Co. built auto bodies as well. The 1925 Model T and the 1929 Rolls-Royce Tourer are two such fine examples.   Cutters, to differentiate them from sleighs, are considered light sleighs, with only one seat, and usually pulled by one horse. It is a distinctly American term that does not appear to have been used prior to 1800.   Bobs refer to short sleds that are used in pairs under the body of a vehicle. These bob-runners, as the ones on the sleigh pictured here, can swivel and therefore make the sleigh easier to turn. They can also make the sleigh a bit unstable in deep snow conditions, especially on downhill runs.    
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  A surrey is a "popular American doorless, four-wheeled carriage of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Usually two-seated (for four passengers), surreys had a variety of tops, ranging from the rigid, fringed canopy-top … to parasol and extension tops."
  The seats were traditional, spindle-backed (often upholstered), bench seats. Before the advent of automobiles, these were horse-drawn carriages.
   A delivery wagon is a wagon used to deliver merchandise such as milk, bread, or produce to houses or markets, as well as to commercial customers, often in urban settings. The concept of express wagons and of paneled delivery vans developed in the 19th century. By the end of the 19th century, delivery wagons were often finely painted, lettered, and varnished, so as to serve as advertisement for the particular business through the quality of the wagon. Special forms of delivery wagon include an ice wagon and a milk wagon.   A buckboard is a four-wheeled wagon of simple construction meant to be drawn by a horse or other large animal.[citation needed] The "buckboard" is the front-most board on the wagon that could act as both a footrest for the driver and protection for the driver from the horse's rear hooves in case of a "buck". The buckboard is steered by its front wheels, which are connected to each other by a single axle. The front and rear axle are connected by a platform of one or more boards to which the front axle is connected on a pivoting joint at its midpoint. A buckboard wagon often carries a seat for a driver. Such a seat may be supported by springs. The main platform between axles is not suspended by springs like a carriage. Made in the 18th century around the same time as carriages.    
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  Hitch Wagon is suitable for Draft show harness.   Spring wagon, four-wheeled vehicle drawn by draft animals (most often horses), having a square box and between two and four movable seat boards. It was a general-purpose wagon used for the transportation of either goods or passengers, and in 19th century America it enjoyed wide popularity with farmers.   Sheep wagons are usually about 7 to 8 feet wide and about 12 to 16 feet long. Inside the wagon is usually room for one bed or bunks, a small stove, sink and cooking area, storage for clothes and an eating area. Most sheep wagons do not have bathrooms or showers.    
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